Andrew Norton

Andrew nortonEntomology

Professor
C212 Plant Sciences
Andrew.Norton@ColoState.edu
970-491-7421 office
970-491-5692 lab

Research Interests:

My research examines the ecology and evolution of pest organisms and their hosts. I have worked with arthropods, crop plants, weeds, pathogens and their natural enemies. Of particular interest to me are multitrophic interactions in biological control systems, and more generally, indirect effects and interaction modification. Current research projects in my lab include the examination of interactions between plant resource availability and the efficacy of weed biological control agents, biological control of and the development of appropriate management strategies for tamarisk (Tamarix spp.), toadflaxes (Linaria vulgaris & L. dalmatica), and pollinator mediated competition between invasive weeds and native plants. In addition to teaching and advising within the BSPM Department, I am also a member of the Graduate Degree Program in Ecology at CSU. As funding permits, I accept graduate students through either program.

Courses I Teach:

AGRI 116– Plants and Civilizations (Spring Semesters)

BSPM 500- Foundations of BSPM

Selected Publications:

Norton, A.P., Blair, A.C., Hardin, J.G., Nissen, S.J. and Brunk, G.R. 2007. Herbivory and novel weapons: no evidence for enhanced competitive ability or allelopathy induction of Centaurea diffusa by biological controls. Biological Invasions. 10(1) 79-88.

Lloyd, C.J., Hufbauer, R.A., Jackson, A., Nissen, S. and Norton, A.P. 2005. Pre- and post-introduction patterns in neutral genetic diversity in the leafy spurge gall midge, Spurgia capitigena (Bremi) (Diptera: Cecidomyiidae). Biological Control. 33(2) 153-16.

MacKinnon, D., Hufbauer, R.A. and Norton, A.P. 2005. Host plant preference of Brachypterolus pulicarius, and inadvertently introduced biological control agent of toadflaxes. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata. 116: 183-189.

Norton, A. P., Belden, E. and English-Loeb, G. 2001. Host plant manipulation of natural enemies: Leaf domatia protect beneficial mites from insect predators.  Oecologia 126: 535-542.

Norton, A.P., English-Loeb, G., Gadoury, D.M. and Seem, R.C. 2000. Mycophagous mites and foliar pathogens: Leaf domatia mediate a plant-arthropod mutualism. Ecology 81(2): 490-499.

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